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Dunkin' Donuts Celebrates 500th New York City Location

Dunkin' Donuts Celebrates 500th New York City Location



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The new New York City location near Times Square celebrated the new location with donuts (obviously) and NFL players.

To celebrate the opening, the new store at West 42nd Street gave out donuts shaped like the number "500" to customers.

The Dunkin’ Donut’s slogan of “America Runs On Dunkin” is apparently true, especially for New York City, now home to 500 Dunkin' locations. To celebrate the opening, the new store at West 42nd Street gave out donuts shaped like the number "500" to customers.

A crowd of people filled the sugar-rushed store, decorated with the signature hot pink and orange balloons, to get their caffeine fix, and maybe add in the 500-shaped donuts to join in the celebrations. Dunkin’ Donuts Brand CEO, Nigel Travis, is familiar with the buzz, as he told the Daily News, “New York kind of captures the feeling of Dunkin’ with the speed, the buzz and the positive vibe that comes out.”

And what would a New York celebration be without the sugary help of NFL stars from the Jets and the Giants? Travis was joined by Carl Banks of the New York Giants and Greg Buttle from the New York Jets, who gave out team-designated donuts, and Dunkin’ memorabilia.

“We feel good about this… We love New York City. We’ve been here since 1958. We’re the biggest retailer in terms of locations in New York, so New York is really important to us,” said Travis. At the end of 2012, there were 10,500 Dunkin’ Donuts stores worldwide, including 7,000 in the Unites States alone.

Customers mentioned that the convenience and affordability of the coffee company as well as the great location because the Times Square area doesn’t have a Dunkin’ Donuts. The 500th location is at 323 W. 42nd street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues.


The Sweet Spot: How Dunkin’ Has Kept the Dough Rising Despite Retail Woes

A merica runs on Dunkin’. Or so the advertising campaign featuring actor John Goodman’s voiceover reminded consumers for years. Increasingly, so does retail leasing in New York City.

Through its franchises, the Canton, Mass.-based coffee and baked goods company has become one of the largest retail presences in the five boroughs, and there’s little end in sight to an expansion that is part of Dunkin’s plan to roll out approximately 1,000 more locations nationwide by 2021.

As of April, Dunkin’ had 639 locations in Gotham, including spots where a shop shares space with another vendor the company owns, such as ice cream seller Baskin-Robbins. Of these, 199 were in Queens, 168 in Manhattan, 143 in Brooklyn, 93 in the Bronx and 36 in Staten Island, according the company.

In 2012, there were 501 Dunkin’ locations in the city. The proportion by borough was pretty similar to today’s, though, with Queens having the most and Manhattan having the second most.

This 21 percent growth in the number of locations since 2012 has come during a decade when national chain retailers have generally reduced their New York footprints.

A record 124 national names registered a net decline in their numbers of city locations in 2018, according to the Center for an Urban Future—the most since the nonprofit think tank began charting the statistic more than 11 years ago. Most of the decline was in Manhattan, where the number of chain stores dropped 2.3 percent in 2018.

Meanwhile, Dunkin’ exited 2018 as the largest national chain retailer in Queens and Staten Island, and the second largest in every other borough. In Manhattan, the company had 166 spots, according to the Center for an Urban Future. Its only real competitors there and elsewhere in the city are its fellow coffee-and-pastry juggernaut Starbucks and cellular hubs from Metro PCS.

The report also marked the 10th consecutive year Dunkin’ has reigned as the city’s largest national retailer. How has it brewed such a footprint?

Since February 2017, Grant Benson has been the senior vice president of franchising and development at Dunkin’ Brands Group, the donut chain’s corporate parent. Before that, he spent 31 years at the company in various capacities. He now leads a team of 10 in developing strategy for New York state, in which the city is the biggest market for Dunkin’.

That team includes director-level positions for development and construction and managers who work with franchisees on siting new stores and deciding which ones should be remodeled to stay on brand. The company remodels about 200 a year in New York state, Benson said in an early May interview.

He also said that Dunkin’s success in New York City hinges on long-term relationships with franchisees and strategic planning about where to put the city’s many, many shops.

“One of the beauties of Dunkin’,” Benson said, “is that we’ve got the opportunity to do a very broad and diverse portfolio. We can do everything from 3,000-square-foot freestanding buildings with drive-thru to [fitting] into 200 square feet with a limited-menu opportunity, maybe in a gas [station or] convenient location [or] maybe in an office building.”

To avoid over-saturation, Benson said the company remains diligent. That due diligence has less to do with finding the right retail rents or calculating out any other real estate costs than it has to do with managing geographic spacing and grand opening times.

“We don’t want to open locations that are going to unduly cannibalize an existing restaurant,” Benson said. “We would want the new locations to be taking new market share or taking market share from competitors as opposed to splitting sales from other [Dunkin’] restaurants.”

On July 9, 2013, Dunkin’ opened its 500th New York City-area store: a Dunkin’ and Baskin-Robbins hybrid at 323 West 42nd Street across from the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

The new spot’s franchisees were longtime business partners Rich Greenstein and Howard Novick. The pair has invested in restaurant chains including Smashburger and other eatery ventures.

They were drawn to Dunkin’ around a decade ago in part by the brand’s longevity—it dates from the late 1940s in Quincy, Mass., just south of Boston—and its relationship with franchisees such as themselves. They also saw New York City as underserved by Dunkin’ when they first reached out to the company, Greenstein said. The two now have 32 Dunkin’s in the city, and another 36 throughout New York State.

They’re neither surprised at Dunkin’s New York reach nor worried about over-saturation.

“The way it works in New York City,” Greenstein said, “people are really looking for convenience.

“We have stores on 37th Street, on 10th Avenue, Ninth Avenue, Eighth Avenue, Broadway, Sixth Avenue—think about that: You have Dunkin’ Donuts bars within a block of each other. You have six in a row practically, and yet all of them do well.”

The reason? New Yorkers are looking for convenience “above all else,” Greenstein said.

Dunkin’s growth spurt in the city is now around a decade old. Relationships with longtime franchisees such as Novick and Greenstein have in large part driven that market penetration to where the city is now one of the nation’s five most densely populated in terms of Dunkin’ stores relative to population. The other four cities are also in the Northeast.

The reliance on long-term relationships was not always the case early on—by necessity, Dunkin’ had to partner with new franchisees—but now relationships with those with longer track records mitigates some of the risk.

“We’re driven almost exclusively at this point in time by working our new growth with existing Dunkin’ franchisees in the market,” Benson said. “Occasionally, there will be an opportunity for a new franchisee to enter. But probably 95 percent of our growth is based on existing franchisees.”

As for the terms these franchisees operate under, the initial franchise fee is between $40,000 and $90,000, depending on the market, and the initial investment ranges from $228,621 to $1,717,103, according to the company. There are recurring royalty fees on gross sales and for advertising and a requirement that franchisees remodel their stores every 10 years. Terms for a Dunkin’ franchise agreement last 20 years.

In January 2018, Dunkin’ unveiled what it called “our next generation concept store,” in Quincy, Mass. It featured millennial-friendly touches such as the company’s first drive-thru exclusively for mobile ordering and digital kiosks fully integrated into the store’s operation. There was also a tap system for serving eight cold beverages at the same time.

A month later, Dunkin’ Brands Group rolled out what it dubbed its “three-year strategic plan” aimed at growing revenue by low to middle single-digit percentages and to realizing a net gain of about 1,000 Dunkin’ locations domestically by 2021, with the eventual goal of more than 18,000 (there were 9,453 as of the first quarter of 2019).

While the company said that most of those new stores will be outside of the Northeast, it expects the New York City proliferation to continue into its second 10-year period.

Benson said that as of spring 2019, his team would continue to use the same metrics and the same relationships in growing in the city, whatever the challenges that made other national chain retailers reduce their footprints in 2018—and whatever the oft-cited retail apocalypse that has seen off so many brick-and-mortar stores.

“Over time, our development pace has moderated to meet the needs of the marketplace,” Benson said. “So, we believe we’re in a healthy run right now in terms of the number of new locations and the number of incremental new units…We’ll continue to adapt as the market demands it.”

Dunkin’ will also lean on that innovation unveiled more than a year ago in the company’s Quincy birthplace. Millennials—the largest generation of Americans by sheer number—are coming into their own as consumers, and retailers well beyond Dunkin’ have found themselves selling a digital experience as much as a physical product.

“They’re starting this whole new program, what they call the next generation,” Greenstein said of Dunkin’. “We’re very impressed with what they’ve done as far as far as design, product development, marketing, and we’re confident they’re going to attract the next generation of users. That’s going to keep the brand very relevant and fresh.

“That’s another reason we’re prepared to invest a lot of money and open more stores.”


Contents

1948–2004: Founding years

William Rosenberg opened Open Kettle in 1948, a restaurant selling donuts and coffee in Quincy, Massachusetts, but he changed the name in 1950 to Dunkin' Donuts after discussing with company executives. [11] [12] He conceived the idea for the restaurant after his experiences selling food in factories and at construction sites, where donuts and coffee were the two most popular items. The restaurant was successful, and Rosenberg sold franchises to others starting in 1955. [13]

In 1963, Rosenberg's son Robert became CEO of the company at age 25, and Dunkin' Donuts opened its hundredth location that year. Dunkin' Donuts was a subsidiary of Universal Food Systems at the time, a conglomerate of 10 small food-service businesses, [14] and Dunkin' Donuts locations varied greatly in their menu options, with some selling full breakfasts and others serving only donuts and coffee.

In the following years, the other businesses in the Universal Food Systems portfolio were sold or closed, and the company was renamed to Dunkin' Donuts. The menu and shop format was standardized, and various new menu items were introduced. The chain was acquired by Baskin-Robbins owner Allied Lyons in 1990. [15] By 1998, the brand had grown to 2,500 locations worldwide with $2 billion in annual sales. [ citation needed ]

Dunkin' Donuts expanded in the 1990s by buying out two rival chains: Mister Donut and Dawn Donuts. [16]

2004–present: Success years in management

In 2004, the company's headquarters were relocated to Canton, Massachusetts. In December 2005, Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins (by then operating under the name Dunkin' Brands) were sold to a private equity consortium of Bain Capital, Carlyle Group, and Thomas H. Lee Partners for $2.4 billion. [17] By 2010, Dunkin' Donuts' global sales were $6 billion. [18]

The Dunkin' Donuts in Natick, Massachusetts launched a program to test the concept of curbside pickup in December 2016. [19] [20]

In January 2018, Dunkin' Donuts began to open new concept locations, beginning in Quincy, featuring modern decor, cold beverages on tap and a single-cup brewing machine, more packaged take-out options, and dedicated pick-up lines for mobile ordering inside and in the drive-thru. The concept was described as being part of a shift towards becoming an "on-the-go, beverage-led brand". In addition, the location, as well as others, began to trial signage referring to the chain as simply "Dunkin ' "—downplaying "Donuts" from the name. [21] [22]

In February 2018, Dunkin' announced plans to phase out polystyrene foam cups globally for environmental purposes by April 2020. [23] [24] [25]

On July 11, 2018, Dave Hoffmann took over from Nigel Travis to become the CEO. He is looking to add 1,000 new locations outside of the Northeastern United States by the end of 2020 and to have a revenue increase of 3 percent for stores open a year or longer. [26] Also late 2018, Dunkin' installed espresso machines at all possible locations and launched espresso products using a new recipe. [27] [28]

In June 2019, Dunkin' partnered with Grubhub to begin the rollout of its new Dunkin' Delivers service. [29] [30] Later in July 2019, Dunkin' partnered with Beyond Meat to introduce a meatless breakfast sandwich in Manhattan, becoming the first U.S. restaurant brand to serve Beyond Sausage. [31] The sandwich launched nationally later in 2019. [32] [33]

In September 2019, the New York attorney general alleged in a lawsuit that Dunkin' mishandled a series of "brute force" cyberattacks that were directed at customers using the Dunkin' mobile app. These attacks took place in early 2015 and thousands of usernames and passwords stolen. The state lawsuit alleges that Dunkin' employees knew about these attacks, but failed to take appropriate action. The New York Attorney General Letitia James alleges the Massachusetts-based company "glazing over" the cyberattacks. A Dunkin' spokesperson said the restaurant chain has been working with law enforcement for two years and will fight the lawsuit. [34]

In October 2020, Dunkin' Brands stated that the company was in conversation with Inspire Brands, a private equity-backed company, negotiating to sell the company. The potential deal would place Dunkin' Donuts within the Inspire Brands' portfolio. [35] It was announced on Saturday, October 31, 2020, by Inspire Brands Inc. that they would be acquiring Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. for $11.3 billion, which would include Dunkin’ Brands’ debt that Inspire Brands would be taking on. Inspire will pay $106.50 in cash for all of Dunkin’ Brands’ shares. [36] On December 15, 2020, the acquisition was completed, and Dunkin' Brands ceased to exist as a separate company, with Dunkin', Baskin-Robbins, and the trademark management of Mister Donuts, becoming part of Inspire Brands. [37]

The company's current slogan is "America Runs on Dunkin ' ". In March 2009, the company unveiled the alternate slogan "You 'Kin Do It!" and launched a $100 million ad campaign promotion. [38] Dunkin' Donuts' "It's Worth the Trip" campaign starred sleepy-eyed "Fred the Baker" and featured the catchphrase "Time to make the donuts". It won honors from the Television Bureau of Advertising as one of the five best television advertisements of the 1980s. Fred the Baker was played by actor Michael Vale for 15 years until his retirement in 1997. The catchphrase was used in the title of founder William Rosenberg's autobiography Time to Make the Donuts: The Founder of Dunkin' Donuts Shares an American Journey.

Dunkin' Donuts changed its slogan in March 2006 to "America Runs on Dunkin ' ". They Might Be Giants songs were featured in a series of advertisements of new products to boost summer sales. [39] In 2007, a series of Dunkin' Donuts commercials referred to the fictional language "Fritalian". "Is it French? Or is it Italian?" sings a chorus of customers facing a long menu of non-English terms. "Perhaps Fritalian?" was created by Hill Holliday to "poke fun at pretentious Starbucks-style coffee chains, with patrons attempting to order hard-to-pronounce lattes." [40] [41] The commercial was interpreted as a deliberate mocking of Starbucks. [41] [42] The commercials' punch line is: "Delicious lattes from Dunkin' Donuts. You order them in English". It has been a point of discussion that latte, cappuccino, and espresso are loanwords from Italian which have no equivalence in English. The commercials, however, refer to the Starbucks ordering language itself, poking fun at words such as grande and venti. [41] Further commercials in 2007 more directly mocked Starbucks, with a customer ordering a "large" and being chastised to use the term "dieci".

Rachael Ray starred in commercials for Dunkin' Donuts beginning in 2007. In May 2008, Dunkin' Donuts removed a commercial from its website featuring Ray wearing a scarf with a black and white paisley floral design, in response to columnist Michelle Malkin's claims that the scarf resembled the keffiyeh worn by Yasser Arafat and therefore a sign of support for terrorists. [43] Dunkin' Donuts pulled that commercial off the air, [44] leading to criticism of the company's perceived kowtowing to special interests. [45]

In 2017, the company announced that it would begin testing the name of simply "Dunkin ' " at some retail locations, as they would like to be thought of as a destination for coffee, its most profitable product. [46] The branding would be implemented in other locations in the latter half of 2018 if it was successful. [47] The brand announced that it would officially be known simply as Dunkin' in September 2018. [48]

On April 3, 2018, Dunkin' Donuts teamed up with the Massachusetts shoe manufacturer, Saucony to produce a strawberry-frosted donut themed running shoe to commemorate the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon. The Saucony X Dunkin' Kinvara 9 came in a donut box and the heel of the shoe was covered in rainbow sprinkles. [49]

A script version of the words Dunkin' Donuts was filed on March 31, 1955, and registered on February 2, 1960. A later logo was for a drawing and word logo depicting a figure with a donut for a head and a coffee cup and donut body wearing a garrison cap, with Dunkin' emblazoned on both the coffee cup and cap. The design was rendered primarily in yellow and brown. The logo was applied for on June 23, 1958, registered on May 23, 1961, and put into use on July 1, 1964. [50]

In 1961, the company began using a hot pink color for its branding and used a logo showing a stylized coffee cup with the company's name rendered on one line as a circle, evoking a donut dunking into the cup. In 1980, bright orange was added to the hot pink. As of 2014, the current logo is a variation of the logo that has been in use since about 1980: an all-capitals rendering of the words Dunkin' Donuts (Dunkin' in orange Donuts in pink) in a thick, Frankfurter typeface [51] with a coffee cup outlined in brown with a "DD" monogram. [52]

In September 2018, the company officially announced that it would shorten its name to Dunkin', with a wider roll-out beginning in January 2019. The company acknowledged that "Dunkin ' " was already a common shorthand name for the chain among customers and in its marketing (including the slogan "America Runs on Dunkin ' "), and that the rebranding would reflect the chain's continuing shift towards being a "beverage-led" brand at a time when consumers have shown a preference for healthier trends and options as they consume fewer donuts. [53] [6] [54] [55] While stores in the U.S. started using the new name in 2019, the rebranding will eventually be rolled out to all of its international stores. [6]

Primary ad agency

In April 2018, Dunkin' named BBDO as their primary advertising agency. This replaced Hill Holliday, which had been producing print, digital, broadcast, and billboard advertising for almost twenty years. Hill Holliday was the agency responsible for the tagline "America Runs on Dunkin ' ". ARC/Leo Burnett was also named to lead all in-store promotions. [56]

Affiliations

Dunkin' has a close relationship with the Boston Red Sox and the New England Patriots, making commercials at the start of each team's season for promotions. Dunkin' also sponsors other professional sports teams, including the Dallas Cowboys, New York Yankees, New York Mets, Philadelphia Eagles, and Tampa Bay Rays.

In 2016, Dunkin' became the official "coffee, donut and breakfast sandwich partner" of the National Hockey League. [57]

In January 2014, English football club Liverpool announced a multimillion-pound global partnership with the company. [58]

Dunkin' Donuts signed a sponsorship deal with the National Women's Hockey League in December 2015. As part of the multi-year agreement, Dunkin’ Donuts is the official hot, iced and frozen coffee of the NWHL. [59]

In 2015, Dunkin' Donuts was announced as the named sponsor of the baseball park in Hartford, Connecticut, new home of the Hartford Yard Goats baseball team. It is named Dunkin' Donuts Park.

In 2001, Dunkin' Donuts purchased the naming rights for the former Providence Civic Center, and renamed it the Dunkin' Donuts Center. The center is currently the home court for the NCAA and Big East Providence Friars men's basketball team from Providence College as well as home ice for the AHL Providence Bruins hockey team. In reference to the center's long association with local college basketball, it is often known locally as "The Dunk".

United States

As of February 9, 2017, all Dunkin' locations are franchisee owned and operated. [60] In addition to its stand-alone shops, Dunkin' shops can be found within many gas stations, supermarkets, mall and airport food courts, and Walmart stores. In July 2013, Dunkin' Donuts opened its 500th restaurant, in New York City. This location is combined with a Baskin-Robbins. [61]

2014 saw the return of Dunkin' Donuts to the state of Minnesota after nearly a decade's absence, with a new shop opened inside the Kahler Grand Hotel in Rochester. [62]

In the United States, Dunkin' is sometimes paired with Baskin-Robbins ice cream in a single multibranded store. While such locations usually maintain separate counters for each chain (much like co-branded Wendy's–Tim Hortons locations in Canada), depending on business that day, both chains' products can be bought at a single counter (usually Dunkin' Donuts'). [ citation needed ] The practice of single-counter service is similar to that of multibranded Yum! Brands stores such as KFC–Taco Bell, which share a single kitchen and cashier line. [63]

On January 16, 2013, Nigel Travis, Dunkin' Brands CEO, announced that the Dunkin' Donuts franchises would be available in California beginning in 2015. [64] In July 2013, Dunkin' Donuts announced that it has signed its first Southern California multi-unit store development agreements with four franchise groups for a total commitment of 45 new restaurants. The first standalone restaurants were expected to open in 2015 in Orange and Los Angeles counties. [65] The chain also planned to expand into more stores in Texas by 2015. [66] On March 10, 2014, the first Dunkin' Donuts/Baskin-Robbins combination store in Southern California opened in Ramona. [67] This is Dunkin' Donuts' third California shop to open, following shops in Barstow and on Camp Pendleton. Since March 2014, Dunkin' Donuts has opened several additional locations throughout California, including the Los Angeles area. Dunkin' Donuts shops opened in the San Francisco Bay Area in Walnut Creek, Half Moon Bay, [68] and American Canyon in 2016, as well as South San Francisco and Fremont, in 2017. [68] [69] [70]

On July 30, 2020 Dunkin' Brands announced it would permanently close 800 shops in the US by the end of the year because of a 20 percent drop of sales in the second quarter during the coronavirus pandemic, 450 of which are part of the previously announced closing of locations within the gas station Speedway chain. [71] [35]

International

By March 2014, Dunkin' Donuts' largest international market was South Korea, representing nearly 40 percent of all international sales. With over 900 outlets in the country, it had three times as many as McDonald's, and about a third more than Starbucks. South Korea is home to Dunkin Donuts' only coffee roasting plant outside the U.S. Still, the company sees China and its vastly larger population as the more lucrative opportunity. In 2008, Dunkin' Donuts opened its first restaurant in Shanghai, representing the first step in its China expansion strategy. By March 2014, it had about 50 stores in the country and an agreement to open 100 more over the next five years. [72] [73]

In Brazil, Dunkin' Donuts opened its first building in 1980. [74] In 2013, it planned to open 25 franchises in the country. [75]

In Colombia, Dunkin' Donuts opened its first store in Bogota in 1983. By 2015, Dunkin' Donuts operated more than 100 stores only in the capital city of the country. [76] Currently it operates more than 150 stores around the country including locations in the cities of Medellin, Cali, Ibague, Pereira, Manizales and Barranquilla. [77]

In January 2014, Dunkin' Donuts relaunched in England (there are no Dunkin Donuts stores in Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales) 20 years after it exited the country with its store opening in Harrow, London. [78]

On December 5, 2014, Dunkin' Donuts opened their first location in the Nordic region, at the Täby Centrum shopping mall in the outskirts of Stockholm, Sweden. [79] [80] [81] On July 24, 2018, Dunkin Donuts announced that the company's Swedish operations had filed for bankruptcy and all locations in Sweden would close immediately. [82] On April 1, 2015, the first store in Denmark opened in Copenhagen Central Station and by May 5, 2015, one opened at Roskilde station. There is still one in construction in Odense. [83]

In early December 2015, Dunkin' Donuts opened their first cafe in 13 years in Warsaw, Poland. The opening of a second location in Warsaw is announced for January 2016. In December 2018 a third branch was under construction in the city. [84]

On January 21, 2016, Dunkin' Brands announced a master franchise agreement with Grand Parade Investments Ltd. that called for developing 250 Dunkin' Donuts and 70 Baskin-Robbins outlets throughout South Africa. [85] The first stores opened in the end of 2016 in the Cape Town area. Eventually, only 11 Dunkin' Donuts locations and five Baskin-Robbins locations opened in South Africa due to GPI's financial trouble. However, by February 2019, Grand Parade Investments announced that it permanently closed all Dunkin' Brands locations in South Africa due to poor performance and unprofitably. [86]

Spain

The term "Donuts" was already trademarked by one of the largest Spanish bakery firms, Panrico, [87] so the company was born as a joint venture between Dunkin' Donuts' then-parent Allied Domecq and Panrico (only Spanish shareholders, representing 50%) in order to use the brand name "Dunkin' Donuts". In 2007, after Dunkin' Donuts bought out Panrico's 50% share, the stores were rebranded to "Dunkin' Coffee". [88] As of 2017, there are 59 Dunkin' Coffee locations in Spain, the majority of which are in Barcelona, Madrid, and Málaga. Their slogan, "Juntos es mejor", translates to "Together is better".

Canada

Despite once having hundreds of stores nationwide, Dunkin' Donuts and its market share all but vanished from Canada by the turn of the century. In the late 1990s to early 2000s, the chain began disappearing from all regions of Canada, with its last foothold in the province of Quebec. However, its decline was most apparent in Quebec, where the chain once had 210 stores but by mid 2017 had only three—the last franchises in the country. [89] By then only one free standing store had the facilities to make donuts fresh on site the other two were merely shopping-mall food-court stands, dependent on the delivery of baked goods from the main store. One of the main reasons for Dunkin' Donuts' decline was competition with Tim Hortons, similar to Tim Hortons' own decline in the northeastern United States due to heavy competition from Dunkin' Donuts. A group of Dunkin' Donuts franchisees won a C$16.4 million civil court judgement against the parent company for failing to adequately promote the brand in Canada. In September 2018, after 57 years of operating in Canada, [90] Dunkin' Donuts ceased business in that country when it refused to renew its franchise license to the few remaining stores left. All remaining Canadian locations were closed or rebranded as independent businesses in late 2018 - ending the presence of Dunkin' Donuts in the country. [91]

Baskin-Robbins - a subsidiary of Dunkin' Brands - continues to operate stores across Canada. [92]

Lebanon

Dunkin' opened its first location in Lebanon in 1998 and has since gained a lot of popularity among Lebanese people and is now one of the most popular coffee shops with many branches spread across the country. In 2020, Dunkin' Lebanon started selling its products in supermarkets and grocery stores.

Japan

In 1970, Japan became the first Asian country to open Dunkin' Donuts stores. The Japanese chain was owned by a joint venture between the Saison Group, Yoshinoya, and the Japanese subsidiary of the Compass Group named Seiyo Food Systems. After 28 years of operating in Japan, Dunkin' Donuts ceased business there in 1998 due to declining sales and poor performance. All of the non-military base locations were either closed or converted to Mister Donut locations. Dunkin' still has locations in United States military bases, which are open only to military personnel.

Israel

Dunkin' Donuts Israel (Hebrew: דאנקן דונאטס ‎) was an Israeli franchise of the chain. Dunkin' Donuts Israel opened their first location within Israel in 1996 in Tel Aviv. Their main flagship store was located in Rabin Square, with their factory in Lod. [93] Upon opening their first location Dunkin' was a tremendous hit. When the original location opened it broke Dunkin's own sales records by selling 3 million doughnuts in the first eight months. [94] The chain's manager was quoted saying "Israelis do not stop eating doughnuts, They buy such quantities, quantities that we would never have believed they would buy. They buy boxes of 12, eat them here, and then buy more boxes to take home." [95] In 2001, when Dunkin' Donuts Israel decided to close, the company had accumulated a large amount of debt. When the Second Intifada broke out, Israeli tourism slowed, and Dunkin' decided to close. [96] Approximately $2 million was invested in Dunkin' Donuts Israel when it failed. [97] At the peak, Dunkin' Donuts had 9 branches in Israel, of their original goal of 15, including 3 in Jerusalem. [93]

Expansion

  • In June 2013, Dunkin' Donuts unveiled a new store design, the brand's first in nearly seven years. [98]
  • Dunkin' Donuts returned to the UK market in January 2014, opening a restaurant in Harrow, a borough in north-west London, England. [99][100]
  • In May 2014, Dunkin' Donuts revealed plans to open 20–25 stores in Denmark, [101] 20–25 stores in Finland[102] and 30 stores in Sweden. [103]
  • In November 2014, Dunkin' Donuts opened its first store in Kanpur, India inside Z Square Mall. [104]
  • In September 2015, Roland Zanelli, the owner of the Dunkin' Donuts license in Switzerland, announced the opening of the first two stores in Basel, Switzerland in Fall 2015, followed by the opening of up to 60 stores in the whole country. [105] The first Basel store opened on March 1, 2016.

In 1997, Dunkindonuts.org was established by a customer for disgruntled consumers and employees to lodge complaints about the company. The site appeared ahead of the company's own website in many search engines and received national media coverage before being purchased by Dunkin' Donuts in 1999. [110]

Dunkin' Donuts was criticized by one of its franchisees for allegedly forcing single-store owners to agree to a buyout at a loss for minor infractions. Dunkin' Donuts sued franchise owners 154 times from 2006 to April 2008. Over the same period, McDonald's was involved in five lawsuits. Subway, a company that has four times the number of locations as Dunkin' Donuts, sued its franchisees 12 times. (These figures do not include arbitrations, which the companies use in pursuing legal claims against their franchisees.) Franchisees allege that the company's business strategy needs predominantly multi-unit franchisees. [111]

In 2009, the company temporarily stopped the sale of two of its products, the Dunkaccino and hot chocolate, after concern of a possible salmonella poisoning at a supplier's facilities. Dunkin' Donuts claims that none of the beverages were contaminated, but the recall was made out of safety for its consumers. [112]

In May 2010, Dunkin' Donuts was criticized for advertising "Free Iced Coffee Day" on its national Facebook page, which took place in only 13 cities. [113] Because of the limited scope of the promotion, many customers became dissatisfied with the lack of free iced coffee and vented their anger on the Dunkin' Donuts Facebook page. [114]

In 2013, the Dunkin' Donuts chain in Thailand used an advertisement that contained a photograph of a woman in black face-paint, in order to promote its new chocolate-flavored donuts. The company was criticized for the advertisement, with the Human Rights Watch calling the advertisement “bizarre and racist”. The headquarters in the United States apologized for the advertisement. [115]

Nancy Lewis, in Canaan, Connecticut, began a petition in January 2014 to request that Dunkin' Donuts donate their unsold food to local shelters and food banks in her area after seeing her local shop regularly throwing away "large amounts" of unsold food. She said because the company has no official policy on the redistribution of its unsold food items to shelters or food banks, and employees are not allowed to take any home, [116] many affiliates throw all of the goods away. [117]


Dunkin' Is Releasing 3 Coconut Refreshers, and We're Already Craving the Golden Peach Flavor

Ah, the sweet taste of summer! Dunkin' Donuts is giving its caffeine-loving customers a taste of pure bliss thanks to the introduction of coconut milk to the menu. Since more and more customers are opting for nondairy milk options, the coffee chain has decided to upgrade its menu to not just include coconut milk, but to also offer new (!) Coconut Refreshers. These coconut-infused drinks come in three flavors — Pink Strawberry, Golden Peach, and Purple Pomegranate — and from now until May 25, you can get a medium-size Refresher for just $3! With a price like that, it's almost too good to be true.

Dunkin' is also adding a new Coconut Milk Iced Latte to its lineup, which is sure to get any espresso-lover excited. It already has oat and almond milk on the menu, and the addition of coconut milk will only add more varieties for both coffee drinks and other beverages (think: a coconut-milk cold brew). Whether you're craving a coffee or a Refresher, these delicious drinks are all you need to get a pick-me-up like never before. Complete with tropical flavors and fruity notes, Dunkin's new coconut-flavored offerings are the perfect summertime treat.


Dunkin' Donuts celebrates 500th New York City unit

Dunkin&rsquo Donuts debuted its 500th New York City location, a co-branded unit with Dunkin&rsquo Brands&rsquo sibling Baskin-Robbins, on Tuesday.

The new restaurant, which is located across from New York&rsquos Port Authority on West 42nd Street, features the brands&rsquo new restaurant design concept, which includes digital menu displays and updated furniture and lighting. The unit also offers electrical outlets and bar top areas for smartphones and computers, and free Wi-Fi access for guests. The unit offers full Dunkin&rsquo Donuts and Baskin-Robbins menus.

The restaurant is franchised by Rich Greenstein and Howard Novick, who currently operate 22 Dunkin&rsquo Donuts and Baskin-Robbins branches in the New York metropolitan area.

The opening kicked off Tuesday with a gala ribbon cutting with Dunkin&rsquo Brands chief executive Nigel Travis.

&ldquoDunkin&rsquo Donuts and Baskin-Robbins are two of the world&rsquos most beloved brands, and we&rsquore excited about opening this location, which will provide those who pass through the &lsquocrossroads of the world&rsquo with Dunkin&rsquo Donuts&rsquo fresh and affordable coffee and baked goods, and Baskin-Robbins&rsquo ice cream and frozen treats,&rdquo Travis said.

Dunkin&rsquo Donuts has more than 10,500 locations in 31 countries. Baskin-Robbins has more than 7,000 outlets in 50 countries.

Contact Paul Frumkin at [email protected] .
Follow him on Twitter: @NRNPaul


Dunkin' Donuts Opens Its 500th Restaurant In New York City

Location will also Feature Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream and Frozen Treats

NEW YORK - July 9, 2013 // PRNewswire // - Dunkin' Donuts, America's all-day, everyday stop for coffee and baked goods, is excited to announce today the grand opening of its 500th restaurant in New York City, which will be a combination restaurant with Baskin-Robbins, the world's largest chain of ice cream specialty shops. With this latest store opening, Dunkin' Donuts remains the largest national retailer in New York City in terms of locations. To celebrate the occasion, the restaurant will host a grand opening celebration this morning complete with a ribbon-cutting ceremony, appearances by Dunkin' Brands leadership and New York City officials, as well as fun giveaways for the guests.

Located in the Times Square area of Manhattan at 323 West 42nd Street, the new location features Dunkin' Donuts' and Baskin-Robbins' new restaurant design concepts, which include bright and modern decor, digital menu displays, comfortable seating and updated furniture and lighting. Featuring electrical outlets and bar top areas for smartphones and computers, as well as a welcoming environment for guests to enjoy Dunkin' Donuts' and Baskin-Robbins' wide range of food and beverages in a friendly and fun atmosphere, the new restaurant will also offer free Wi-Fi Internet access for guests. The new restaurant will be open from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week, and will employ approximately 20-25 crew members.

The new restaurant will offer a complete menu of Dunkin' Donuts' great-tasting food and beverages that can be enjoyed all day, including favorites such as a wide variety of hot and iced coffee, lattes and cappuccinos and signature bakery items such as donuts and breakfast sandwiches. The location will also feature Baskin-Robbins' wide selection of delicious ice cream flavors, premium soft serve products, custom ice cream cakes, and flavorful beverages, including Milkshakes, Smoothies and Cappuccino Blast® frozen drinks.

"Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins are two of the world's most beloved brands, and we're excited about opening this location, which will provide those who pass through the 'crossroads of the world' with Dunkin' Donuts' fresh and affordable coffee and baked goods, and Baskin-Robbins' ice cream and frozen treats," said Nigel Travis, Dunkin' Brands' Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. "We're truly proud to be able to serve the people of New York City, at this location and at hundreds of others around town, and this celebration marks a continuation of our service to them."

Rich Greenstein and Howard Novick are the franchise partners for this combination Dunkin' Donuts / Baskin-Robbins location, and currently operate 22 Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins restaurants in the New York City metro area. Greenstein and Novick opened their first restaurant with the brands in 2006.


Dunkin' Donuts Opens Its 500th Restaurant In New York City

NEW YORK , July 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Dunkin' Donuts, America's all-day, everyday stop for coffee and baked goods, is excited to announce today the grand opening of its 500 th restaurant in New York City , which will be a combination restaurant with Baskin-Robbins, the world's largest chain of ice cream specialty shops. With this latest store opening, Dunkin' Donuts remains the largest national retailer in New York City in terms of locations. To celebrate the occasion, the restaurant will host a grand opening celebration this morning complete with a ribbon-cutting ceremony, appearances by Dunkin' Brands leadership and New York City officials, as well as fun giveaways for the guests.

Located in the Times Square area of Manhattan at 323 West 42 nd Street, the new location features Dunkin' Donuts' and Baskin-Robbins' new restaurant design concepts, which include bright and modern decor, digital menu displays, comfortable seating and updated furniture and lighting. Featuring electrical outlets and bar top areas for smartphones and computers, as well as a welcoming environment for guests to enjoy Dunkin' Donuts' and Baskin-Robbins' wide range of food and beverages in a friendly and fun atmosphere, the new restaurant will also offer free Wi-Fi Internet access for guests. The new restaurant will be open from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week, and will employ approximately 20-25 crew members.

The new restaurant will offer a complete menu of Dunkin' Donuts' great-tasting food and beverages that can be enjoyed all day, including favorites such as a wide variety of hot and iced coffee, lattes and cappuccinos and signature bakery items such as donuts and breakfast sandwiches. The location will also feature Baskin-Robbins' wide selection of delicious ice cream flavors, premium soft serve products, custom ice cream cakes, and flavorful beverages, including Milkshakes, Smoothies and Cappuccino Blast® frozen drinks.

"Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins are two of the world's most beloved brands, and we're excited about opening this location, which will provide those who pass through the 'crossroads of the world' with Dunkin' Donuts' fresh and affordable coffee and baked goods, and Baskin-Robbins' ice cream and frozen treats," said Nigel Travis , Dunkin' Brands' Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. "We're truly proud to be able to serve the people of New York City , at this location and at hundreds of others around town, and this celebration marks a continuation of our service to them."

Rich Greenstein and Howard Novick are the franchise partners for this combination Dunkin' Donuts / Baskin-Robbins location, and currently operate 22 Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins restaurants in the New York City metro area. Greenstein and Novick opened their first restaurant with the brands in 2006.


Dunkin' adds digital business veteran to board, hits NYC milestone

Dunkin' Brands Group Inc., parent company of Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, announced the election of Carl Sparks to its board of directors, effective July 26. Sparks, 45, is the president and CEO of Travelocity Global.

"Carl is one of the pre-eminent business leaders in the digital business space, and we are delighted he has joined Dunkin' Brands' board of directors," said Nigel Travis, chairman and CEO, Dunkin' Brands. "With his extensive online and digital background, he will be a tremendous addition to our board. We look forward to benefitting from his insights as we continue to develop new and compelling programs to enhance the engagement with our communities worldwide."

Before joining Travelocity, Sparks served as president of Gilt Groupe, an online fashion and travel retailer. Sparks also spent five years implementing marketing programs in a variety of leadership roles for Expedia Inc., serving as general manager for Hotels.com North America, and as chief marketing officer for Expedia.com.

Sparks is a current member of the board of directors of Vonage Holdings Corp. He holds an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School and a B.S.E. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University.

500th Dunkin' Donuts opens in NYC

Also this week, Dunkin' Donuts announced the grand opening of its 500th restaurant in New York City, which is a combination restaurant with Baskin-Robbins. Dunkin' Donuts is the largest national retailer in New York City in terms of locations, according to the company.

Located in the Times Square area of Manhattan at 323 West 42nd St., the new location features Dunkin' Donuts' and Baskin-Robbins' new restaurant design concepts, as well as the brands' full menus.

Rich Greenstein and Howard Novick are the franchise partners for this unit and operate 22 Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins restaurants in the New York City metro area. Greenstein and Novick opened their first restaurant with the brands in 2006.

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Dunkin' Donuts Sues Shop Owner Over Mice

This was 15 minutes of fame Dunkin' Donuts did not want.

It began last week with a photograph in The New York Post of a mouse munching on a doughnut in the window of a shop in midtown Manhattan. More articles followed. Soon everyone was cracking jokes about what Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani called a 'ɽisgusting, horrible story.'' David Letterman placed the news of the mouse infestation on his ''Top Ten List'' of things overheard in Times Square.

''Number nine,'' he declared. ''It's so cold the rat on my doughnut just froze.''

Yesterday, Dunkin' Donuts struck back, filing a lawsuit in Federal District Court in Manhattan that accused the Riese Organization, the company that owns and runs the franchise outlet at 46th Street and Fifth Avenue, of breaching its contract by not meeting the doughnut chain's health and sanitation standards. The suit seeks a court order forcing Riese to close the shop and remove the familiar Dunkin' Donuts sign.

'ɺnytime someone laughs at your trademark and what's going on in your shops, you've been damaged,'' said Jack Laudermilk, a lawyer for the Dunkin' Donuts chain, which is based in Randolph, Mass.

''We've been made the butt of a joke in New York -- on television, in the newspapers,'' he said. ''We take it not as funny but as something very serious.''

Dunkin' Donuts has about 3,400 stores nationwide, including about 200 in New York City, of which about 30 are run by Riese, said Jennifer L. Rosenberg, a spokeswoman for the chain.

She said that Dunkin' Donuts has sent workers to inspect all of the stores run by Riese, as well as others in New York, ''to make sure that all of the locations are up to our standards for sanitation and food and safety and quality.''

The shop in question, she said, will remain open until the suit is resolved.

Dunkin' Donuts said it notified Riese on Thursday, the day after the first Post article appeared, that it was terminating its franchise contract for that location. It is not clear from the lawsuit whether Riese is contesting the action, or what explanation Riese may have. Dunkin' Donuts said that it was not seeking to end its contract for other shops run by Riese.

A Riese spokeswoman would not comment last night, saying the company had not yet reviewed the suit. Riese is a major operator of fast-food restaurants in Manhattan, including outlets of Nathan's, Roy Rogers and T.G.I. Friday's.

Dunkin' Donuts said in the suit that the shop shared common storage, refrigeration and seating areas with two other fast-food restaurants run by Riese at the same address, and that the location had been 'ɼited numerous times'' by the New York City Department of Health for sanitation-related violations, including the presence of vermin.

Moving quickly and forthrightly can be an important means of restoring a company's reputation when a crisis occurs, marketing experts have said. Stephen A. Greyser, a professor of marketing at Harvard Business School, said the suit is a correct step, but may not be sufficient.

He said the publicity could turn the problem into a national one, as customers who consider eating at Dunkin' Donuts shops around the country ponder what they may find there.

The suit '⟎rtainly sends a signal to other franchisees,'' Professor Greyser said. ''That's very important. The point is, these kinds of things, if you pardon the pun, can have a long tail.''


Dunkin' Donuts Plans New Stores By the Dozens

WHILE many New Yorkers have come to accept the inevitability of buying their ever-so-strong morning coffee from a cool green and brown Starbucks shop, a much older and brassier competitor is making a new play for the Manhattan palate.

The Dunkin' Donuts chain has moved into lattes and espressos and has begun a major push to expand in Manhattan and across the region. The goal is to create a total of 200 outlets in Manhattan over the next few years, at least matching Starbucks store for store.

Dunkin' Donuts' shops are heralded by orange and plum striped awnings and often are combined with Baskin-Robbins ice cream stores. To the consternation of neighborhood preservationists, the awnings are usually topped by a white to-go-style coffee cup, a yard wide and 44 inches high, perched over the entrance like a parade balloon gone astray.

New Dunkin' Donuts have been spotted downtown on the corners of Church and Murray Streets and Nassau and Gold Streets, and to the north on Christopher Street. Another has opened on Seventh Avenue at 26th Street, and three others are in the heart of Starbucks country on the Upper East Side: at Madison and 97th Street and on Second Avenue at 93rd Street and 72nd Street.

There are three new stores in Harlem, including one at 141st Street and Broadway, only three blocks from a store that Starbucks shut down last spring, despite neighborhood protests, citing lagging sales. Another Dunkin' Donuts is due to open at West 161st Street and Broadway.

All these stores have milder roast coffee than the strong Italianate coffee at Starbucks. They have bagels, but no wireless connections, jazzy music or a sense of being at a destination, a place to hang out. While Starbucks has tall, grande and venti, Dunkin' Donuts has small, medium and large.

At some Manhattan stores where rents are pricey, there is room for only a few chairs at Dunkin' Donuts. But they do have plenty of coffee, produced under controlled conditions, and even machines to measure out sugar and milk automatically.

Company officials say their new signs were approved under city permits. But Kate Wood, executive director of Landmarks West, a preservation group, called the new signs, especially those that are illuminated, "an invasion of public space."

Steve Menexas and his partners -- his brother, brother-in-law and cousin -- have opened four Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins franchises in the last 18 months and have plans to open 20 more stores in the next five to seven years in Manhattan between East 14th Street and East 43rd Street.

Their store rents run from $5,000 a month for the smallest up to $12,000 a month for their latest store, at 40th Street and Second Avenue, on the site of a former deli, with a 1,000-square-foot mezzanine, a 1,500-square-foot main floor and an outdoor seating area. Downstairs in a 3,500-square-foot basement, the owners have installed a bagel and doughnut bakery, where they turn out runs of 500 dozen doughnuts, twice a day, for delivery to 10 Dunkin' Donuts stores.

Mr. Menexas has deep roots in the fast food business. He owns Gyro King in the Bronx and has a background in pizzerias. He said coffee is a great business to be in. "You wake up in the morning and you need it -- it's like medicine," he said. "We have loyal customers who walk six or seven blocks a day to buy our coffee."

In the New York area, coffee and other drinks now make up 62 percent of sales at Dunkin' Donuts, and 10 percent is attributed to the new espresso and latte drinks.

Unlike Starbucks' premium image, Dunkin' Donuts' image has been more working class. The company began in 1946 as a caterer, with mobile sites serving factory workers, and expanded as a franchise operation across the Northeast, including New York City.

Malcolm M. Knapp, a restaurant consultant, said that from the first the franchise system emphasized a uniform quality, enforced by a thick manual, which required that leftover coffee be thrown out every 20 minutes. "The easiest thing in the world at one level is to brew a good cup of coffee," he said. "The hardest thing in the world is to brew a good cup consistently."

In 1989, facing a hostile takeover bid, the company instead sold out to a British company, now known as Allied Domecq, which owns or distributes many major liquor brands and also owns the Baskin-Robbins and Togo's brands. By the 1990's Dunkin' Donuts languished, as first Starbucks and then Krispy Kreme showed there was a market for pricey coffee and doughnuts.

Some of the older Dunkin' Donuts stores in Manhattan became run-down, and today some are still in need of renovation. According to Mr. Knapp, New York City was a problem area for Dunkin' Donuts, because of conflict between the company and a large Manhattan restaurant company, the Riese Organization, which operates 19 local Dunkin' Donuts, along with the Times Square Grill, Charley O's and many fast food franchises.

But two years ago, Allied Domecq began a reorganization. It installed new espresso machines in many stores -- the Riese stores are due to get them this spring -- to produce cappuccino, espresso, latte and iced latte with flavors like caramel swirl.

Dunkin' Donuts also began a major expansion across the country. Mark McClellan, director of development for Dunkin' Brands in the New York metropolitan area, said the company had 40 stores in Manhattan when the campaign began, now has 63 and is planning to develop a total of 150 to 200 stores in the borough, including 50 that have already been assigned to franchisees. Starbucks now lists 164 stores in Manhattan.

Mr. McClellan said Dunkin' Donuts believed it could find good locations and compete in any neighborhood in the city and could "penetrate any demographic group." He said the company is looking for locations of 800 to 2,000 square feet in Manhattan (suburban locations are typically 2,300 square feet), preferably on corners, "with good viewpoints" for pedestrians to see signs from a long way off.

From Starbucks' point of view, Dunkin' Donuts is no competition for its core customers. A Starbucks spokesman, Dan Lewis, said in a statement that Starbucks offers "a unique opportunity for our customers -- the Starbucks Experience."

"Starbucks believes there is room for many competitors in the marketplace that can meet different customers' needs," he said.

This interplay can be seen on Second Avenue, between 32nd and 33rd Street. Starbucks stands on one corner and a new Dunkin' Donuts on the other, separated only by a Duane Reade drugstore.

O'Neil Lawrence, a manager at the Starbucks, said that when the Dunkin' Donuts first opened, customers sampled the new store. "It was slow the first few months, but then business came back," he said.

Echeviri Gonzalo, a limousine driver from Colombia, walked out of Starbucks carrying a coffee and said that he preferred Starbucks' strong taste and drinks five or six cups a day, but only after starting the day with a Dunkin' Donuts coffee at a shop near his home in Flushing.

And then Jon Macy, who recently graduated from New York Law School, emerged from Starbucks to sing the praises of Dunkin' Donuts. "I like their coffee better," he said, "but I went to Starbucks to study for the bar exam."


Watch the video: English subtitles Baskin Robbins VLOG 배스킨라빈스 브이로그 입니다!! 배라는 비가오면 손님이 없어서 아주 굿! 입니다 (August 2022).