New recipes

Leblebi (Tunisian chickpea soup) recipe

Leblebi (Tunisian chickpea soup) recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Soup
  • Bean and lentil soup
  • Bean soup

This simple nourishing soup is often served for the iftar (breaking fast) during the month of Ramadan. The amount of harisa is up to taste, my Tunisian sister-in-law who gave me this recipe makes it much spicier than I do, it tastes good either way.

4 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, minced
  • 250g dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in cold water
  • 1.5L vegetable stock
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon harissa, to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • juice of 1/2 lemon or lime

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:1hr10min ›Ready in:1hr25min

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot. Add the onion and cook until translucent.
  2. Drain the soaked chickpeas and add them to the pot together with the vegetable stock. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and cover. Simmer for 30 minutes.
  3. In the meantime toast the cumin in a small ungreased frying pan, then grind them in a mortar. Add the garlic and salt and pound to a fine paste.
  4. Add the paste and the harissa to the soup and simmer until the chickpeas are tender, about 30 minutes.
  5. Season to taste with salt, pepper and lemon juice and serve hot.

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)


Lablabi: The Best Soup in the World | Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street

In this episode, we take a look at Spanish classics. Watch now.

Take a cooking class with us and our instructors from around the world.

NEW - 125 simple weeknight recipes from the world's healthiest cuisine.

850+ hard-to-find items from around the world.

Everything Milk Street. 12 weeks for just $1. Start your trial here.


Chickpea and Harissa Soup (Lablabi)

For our version of this brothy-bready chickpea soup, we used garlic, tomato paste and toasted cumin to bolster the broth's flavor. And instead of using stale bread&mdashas is common in Tunisia&mdashwe got better texture by toasting chunks of crusty bread in olive oil to make croutons. Toasted ground cumin is used in the soup as well as on it to be efficient, toast it all at once. In a small, dry skillet over medium, toast 5 tablespoons ground cumin, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute, then transfer to a small bowl. To make soft-cooked eggs for serving, bring 2 cups water to a simmer in a large saucepan fitted with a steamer basket. Add the desired number of eggs, cover and steam over medium for 7 minutes. Immediately transfer the eggs to ice water to stop the cooking,


Leblebi (Tunisian chickpea soup) recipe - Recipes

In Tunisia, chickpea soup is a street food, served as a hearty breakfast to men on their way to work. But you can garnish it and serve it at any meal.

Middle Eastern cookbook author Aglaia Kremezi’s advises:

“Leblebi is yet another ingenious combination of legumes and all kinds of readily available vegetables, herbs, and spices that create an irresistibly satisfying dish. Slowly cooking the chickpeas in the oven, inside a clay pot, as Paula Wolfert suggests, makes a wonderfully flavored, silky base. But precooked frozen chickpeas, simmered briefly with garlic in their broth, will make excellent leblebi, flavored with homemade h’rous and sprinkled with Aegean herb and hot pepper mix.”

RECIPE: TUNISIAN CHICKPEA SOUP (LEBLEBI)

A note about the chickpeas: Don’t use them from a can, as easy as it is. Cooking them from scratch makes a huge difference. You can make them ahead of time, refrigerate, and reheat them when you want to serve your soup.
Ingredients For 6-8 Servings


Toppings Per Person


*If you don’t like runny poached eggs, substitute chopped or sliced hard-boiled eggs.

Let people customize their soup garnishes. Select a variety from the following, and place them in ramekins or small bowls:

Preparation

1. PREHEAT the oven to 225°F (110°C). Drain the soaked chickpeas and place them in a clay casserole with a lid (a Dutch oven will work, too). Add the broth, garlic, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste, and extra broth as needed to cover the chickpeas by 1 inch (2.5 cm). Bring to a boil over medium heat, cover, and place in the oven for at least 3 hours, until the chickpeas are soft and silky. (Note from Rancho Gordo: “Our chickpeas are so fresh, it may not take anywhere near this long to cook. Check frequently after about an hour.”)

You can make the soup up to this point and store it in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. When you are ready to serve…

2. REHEAT the chickpeas in their liquid while you poach the eggs. You should have one egg for each bowl of soup.

3. POACH the eggs with this method from Paula Wolfert: Fill a bowl with ice water. In a pan of boiling water, add the eggs, still in their shells. Cover with the lid and turn off the heat. After 6 minutes, slip the eggs into the ice water to cool. Once they are cool, peel them carefully.

4. PLACE a few cubes of bread in the bottom of a bowl and cover with some of the chickpeas and their cooking liquid. Set an egg on top and cut it so that the yolk runs. Drizzle some harissa over the top, add sun-dried tomato and roasted pepper (if using), and sprinkle with the cumin and black pepper. Top with olives and capers. Drizzle good, fruity olive oil on top and squeeze the lemon wedge over the soup. Repeat for each serving.


Leblebi (Tunisian chickpea soup) recipe - Recipes

I've always been fascinated by the tantalizing and robust flavors that are so distinctive of Mediterranean cuisines. There is a vibrancy about so many of the dishes that are native to this considerable expanse of land with varying traditions and characteristics. As a vegetarian, I also find there is a wealth of dishes that are perfectly suited to a vegetarian diet, and ones that are easily adapted to suit such preferences.

This Tunisian chickpea soup, known as Lablabi, is one such example, and as I enjoy soups no matter the time of year — and certainly chickpeas, which are one of my favorite legumes — I thought that I would share this easy-to-prepare soup here. Lablabi is commonly served over small chunks of stale crusty bread, and always with plenty of toppings, notably harissa. Traditionally served for breakfast, in addition to other toppings, a poached or soft cooked egg is added to the hot soup so that the soft yolk bleeds into the the broth. The egg is not necessary at all, unless you so please, and it's enjoyable anytime of the day.

There is a bit of heat in the brothy chickpeas, which are simmered with garlic and spices, but the real kick comes from harissa, which is swirled onto each serving. One of the most interesting aspects of this dish is that it can be served with different garnishes so that each diner can add what is most pleasing to their palates and also use more or less harissa as desired.

Despite the strong and robust flavors present, it is actually a fairly light soup, but serving it up with some crusty bread makes it a complete and satisfying meal in itself, as do the toppings that adorn each bowl.

Harissa is a Tunisian fiery paste made with hot chilies, garlic, olive oil and seeds and spices such as cumin, coriander, and caraway. Sometimes sun-dried tomatoes are included as well. It is easy to make at home, but there are plenty of prepared varieties that can easily be purchased at the supermarket. No matter whether you make you own or purchase it from an outside source, do taste it before adding it to your dishes so you know what you are dealing with. Sometimes just a little is A LOT.

Note: Use 2 (14 oz) cans of chickpeas instead of the dried chickpeas if you wish to skip the steps of soaking and cooking the chickpeas. Just drain and rinse the canned chickpeas and proceed with the second step.

North African Chickpea Soup (Lablabi)
Recipe by Lisa Turner
Cuisine: Tunisian
Published on May 29, 2019

Easy to make spicy and brothy North African chickpea soup with an assortment of colorful and delicious toppings

Preparation: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes

  • 1 cup dried chickpeas (3 cups cooked or 2 14 oz cans)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 cups vegetable stock or water
  • 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt, or to taste
  • fresh cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice, or to taste
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons harissa, to taste, thinned with a little water
  • roughly chopped roasted red peppers
  • handful of pitted Kalamata olives
  • 2 to 4 sun-dried tomatoes, rehydrated and cut into strips
  • 2 to 3 green onions, sliced
  • finely chopped fresh parsley or cilantro
  • olive oil
  • freshly cracked black pepper

Rinse the chickpeas and soak in several inches of water for 8 hours or overnight. Drain and rinse, then transfer to a medium saucepan. Cover with fresh water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the chickpeas are tender, about 1 hour. Drain and set aside.

Heat the olive oil in the same saucepan over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the chickpeas, paprika, cumin, chili powder and oregano. Stir for about 1 minute and then pour in the vegetable stock or water and stir in the salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium, and simmer, covered, for about 20 minutes until the chickpeas are buttery soft. Stir in the lemon juice.

To serve, scoop some of the chickpeas with their broth into serving bowls, swirl in some harissa, top with some roasted red peppers, a few olives, sun-dried tomatoes, green onions or fresh herbs, and drizzle in some robust olive oil. Crack some black pepper over the bowls to finish. Serve with crusty bread to soak up the liquid, or serve cubes of the bread in bowls and scoop the brothy chickpeas over top if desired, and proceed with adding toppings of choice.


Lablabi or Leblebi – A Tunisian Chickpea Soup

Since I have started exploring African and Mediterranean cuisine these past few weeks, I have been surprised by two things:

  1. The number of vegetarian options that are available (then there are non-vegetarian recipes that could be adapted to become vegetarian).
  2. How “Indian” some of these dishes taste.

Today, I am exploring Lablabi or Leblebi, a chickpea soup from Tunisia. When I stumbled upon this recipe, I could instantly identify with the tastes. I was also a bit curious about how it would taste as it had so few spices and ingredients.

To be honest, even while it was cooking I was a bit iffy, but when I put it all together, the Lablabi turned out to be super delicious! As a bonus, this chickpea soup is relatively low-calorie, protein-rich and spicy. What more can one ask for?

Here’s to exploring more of African cuisine, especially Tunisian.

Lablabi is served on a bed of slightly old crusty bread with an assorted set of toppings such as Harissa, Preserved Lemon, Fresh Tomatoes, Poached Eggs, and more.

Lablabi looks and should be watery. This liquid will be absorbed by the bread which is an integral part of serving the Lablabi. The bread, after it absorbs the water, tastes simply divine!


Leblebi (Tunisian chickpea soup) recipe - Recipes

Today we feature a vegetarian iftar recipe from Tunisia called the leblebi , which is chickpea soup. This dish is made a lot in Tunisia during the Ramadan period. This recipe is relatively easy to make, and is a nutritious vegetarian iftar meal that will be loved by all in the family, especially the children.


Vegetarian Iftar Recipe
Leblebi
Tunisian Chickpea Soup

28 ounces canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed OR
2 cups dried chickpeas soaked overnight in 2 quarts of water, then drained and rinsed after 1-2 hours of steady, covered simmer until tender [Length of cooking depends on age of chickpeas and heat intensity.]
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
4 large garlic cloves, minced
5 cups water
2 generous teaspoons toasted ground cumin (Heat for 5 minutes in a dry skillet or until browned and fragrant.)
2 teaspoons harisa, prepared or homemade
[No additional salt needed. Harisa, capers and preserved lemon all contain salt.]

Any one or more of the following garnishes:

capers
cilantro leaves
parsley leaves
chopped bell pepper
toasted cumin seeds
chopped hard-cooked egg
preserved lemon slices
toasted bread strips or croutons
additional harisa

In a large saucepan over medium-low heat, warm the olive oil then add the onion, stirring occasionally until it is translucent and golden without browning. Add garlic, coating with onion mixture before stirring in the chickpeas, water, ground cumin and harisa. Simmer for 30 minutes. Garnish as desired.


Sangi's Food World

Today I am here with a soup recipe from Tunisia. What made me to try this soup is the 9th Mediterranean cooking event at Tobiascooks.com. We got to make any dish from Tunisia, to get into this event. I searched for various recipes, of all, this chickpea soup impressed me. Its quiet simple recipe that was very similar to our Indian cooking using the same spices as we do.

Tunisian cuisine in general is very similar to Indian cuisine, using more common spices like cumin, coriander. This chickpea soup is popularly known as Lablabi or Leblebi in Tunisia. It is the common breakfast soup there, which is very light and served with a variety of condiments like chopped bell peppers, chopped cilantro, chopped spring onions, eggs and of course the Tunisian traditional hot sauce called has Harissa.

We enjoyed this soup for our evening snack with home made harrisa, spring onions and bell peppers as condiments. Going to the recipe now..

Things needed for the Soup
Dried Chick peas - 1 Cup (Soaked overnight)
Onion - 1 small sized ( Chopped)
Garlic pearls - 3 nos. ( Chopped)
Cumin seeds - 1 Tsp
Olive oil - 1 Tsp
Harissa - 1 Tbsp ( We like spicy food, so I have added more of harissa, if needed adjust to your taste)
Vegetable broth - 2 Cups
Salt - To taste

Add the drained chick peas and vegetable broth to the vessel and get it to boil. Let this mixture cook on medium flame for 20 minutes or until the chick peas are cooked soft. During this wait time I got the harissa done.

Things needed for Harissa/ Hot sauce
Dry chillies - 3 nos.
Cumin seeds - 1 Tbsp
Coriander seeds - 1/2 Tbsp
Garlic pearls - 4 nos.
Olive oil - 1 Tbsp
Salt - To taste

Soak the red chillies in hot water for about 30 minutes. Then remove its seeds and stem. Dry roast the cumin seeds. Blend the chillies, cumin, coriander seeds, garlic, salt into a fine or coarse paste by adding olive oil. The traditional method calls for use of mortar and pestal for making the harissa paste. Due to lack of the mortar, I used blender and my harissa turned out to be a smoother paste. Finally add salt and adjust to your taste. The Tunisian hot sauce is now ready.


Chickpea Soup for Breakfast?

If you’re from (or spent time in) North Africa you may not be aware that soup for breakfast is a slightly exotic notion here in North America. Granted, breakfast porridges and gruels, like oatmeal and wheat semolina are quite common. But actual savory soup with stock and vegetable matter? No so much. To me Lablabi is pretty interesting stuff.

I’d love to tell about how I first encountered Lablabi in a little cafe I stumbled upon while vacationing in Tunis, but I’m afraid the truth is much less romantic. A few weeks ago, while eating a breakfast of almond milk chia pudding and blueberries, it occurred to me that I really didn’t know a lot about breakfasts served in the Mediterranean region. This lead to research, you know, like I do.

The first breakfast I ran across was this amazing yogurt and poached egg breakfast dish from Turkey called Cilbir . I’ve been experiment with it, so look for that recipe next week! This Tunisian breakfast chickpea soup was the second breakfast I discovered.

It may seem strange, but Lablabi reminds me of Mexican Pozole in a way (I’d just recently done a post about Pozole Verde ). You have this brothy, savory chickpea soup (instead of hominy), fortified with hot spicy chilies (harissa in this case) that you then garnish and fortify with a wide variety of tasty extras. The method, the ingredients, the ritual of preparing your portion by customizing it with the extras you like–it’s very similar. I knew I’d like Lablabi right out of the gate.


Leblebi (Tunisian chickpea soup) recipe - Recipes

Leblebi ( Tunisian Chickpea Soup) - Adapted from the Global Gourmet recipe

28 ounces canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed OR
2 cups dried chickpeas soaked overnight in 2 quarts of water, then drained and rinsed after 1-2 hours of steady, covered simmer until tender [Length of cooking depends on age of chickpeas and heat intensity.]
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
4 large garlic cloves, minced
5 cups water
2 generous teaspoons toasted ground cumin (Heat for 5 minutes in a dry skillet or until browned and fragrant.)
2 teaspoons harisa, prepared or homemade
[No additional salt needed. Harisa, capers and preserved lemon all contain salt.]

Any one or more of the following garnishes:

capers
cilantro leaves
parsley leaves
chopped bell pepper
toasted cumin seeds
chopped hard-cooked egg
preserved lemon slices
toasted bread strips or croutons
additional harisa

In a large saucepan over medium-low heat, warm the olive oil then add the onion, stirring occasionally until it is translucent and golden without browning. Add garlic, coating with onion mixture before stirring in the chickpeas, water, ground cumin and harisa. Simmer for 30 minutes. Garnish as desired. Serves 4. --

Cilantro, cumin seeds, preserved lemons, capers, and that
extra dollop of harisa, a riot of garnishes for the eyes and tongue.

This post is being submitted to Holler of Tinned Tomatoes, hosting No Croutons Required, a monthly soup event that is also hosted by Lisa of Lisa's Vegetarian Kitchen. This month's theme is Spicy Soups.

37 comments:

Im a spice junkie too. As I get the older the more I can take.

Drooling!! Almost all the the ingredients are like Indian, love the brilliant color of that Harissa.
I bought a Tagine last week, will have to show off some day!D
I will be on break from the 20th, spring break, beach and lot of reading ahead. )

can have that bowl please. i cannot resist chick peas!the color is so bright. i can almost taste it:)

Susan, I just knew you would come up with a delicious soup. Chickpeas are probably my favorite legume, and I always have some homemade harisa on hand I can't wait to try this. Thanks so much for participating!

I'm all about the heat and that sounds like a delicious soup! I really like the last photo

That sure looks . bloodthirsty! :D I'm no expert but I find that if I put food in a dish that's the same colour, the effect is usually good. I love the third photo!

Thats 'Ah-ha, Harissa'. Wickedly delicious.

Did you say heat-junkie?! That's why I love you so :)

Lovely, especially the 'I am about to dive into this bowl' third photo.

I have never tried harisa, Susan - that soup looks comforting and delicious!

Mon mari would love this.
Moi? I'm a little shy of all that heat. But I'd try. as long as I had some yogurt to hand!

Wow love the colour..I'd like to dig into that now!

The flavors are screaming through the photos! Wow!

I love this recipe because of its simple base, garnished with a flurry of powerful flavors. It sounds like the chickpea is a vehicle for harissa, cumin, and preserved lemon delivery, and that is an idea that makes me want to put this on the stove right now. Great post.

How gorgeous. And -- I love preserved lemons! Man, I could just dig into that right now, even though it's too pretty to disturb. )

Mmmm! I just made a new batch of harrisa yesterday, so I really must try your soup soon!

Harissa and preserved lemons are surely the stuff of heady, heat-induced dreams. Each mouthful exciting, yet elegant.

Glamah – I can handle more spice as I get older, too. I’ve heard the theory that some of our tastebuds can dull over time, so we need more to get the same effect, although I will probably be ninety before I can handle habanero. )
--
Thanks, Asha. You’re going to have such fun w/ your tagine. See you when you return from break. Hope you have a great time.
--
Nanditha – Chickpeas are my all-time favorite legume. That fiery red color is strictly from the harisa, despite the red bowl. The flavor is really spectacular. So good to see you.
--
Thank you, Lisa. Time prevented me from making my own harisa, but I have jars of it prepared from both Morocco and Tunisia which I am happy with for the moment. Really looking forward to the round-up.
--
Hi, Mike! Thanks! That last photo tastes even better than it looks.
--
Sra – Thanks. I promise there are no sharks in that bowl! Color definitely has an effect on us. Sometimes contrast will really pop in an image, but other times, the power of similar hues works best.
--
Suganya – Wicked…yes… )
--
Cynthia – xoxo!
--
Thanks, Simona. That third bowl could have been crowded with even more and varied tidbits, but I was running out of room!
--
Patricia – Thank you! Think of grinding up dried red pepper flakes with a few more spices, salt and some olive oil – that’s a general approximation that may, at least, give you an idea. Good to see you!
--
Hi, Katie! Bread and beer seem to work best to quell the heat. : D
--
Thanks, Rachel. I’d like some right now, myself after all, it is traditionally served for breakfast. )
--
Thanks, Lori Lynn. “Screaming” is the operative word. )
--
Christina – Thanks so much. This soup is very, very easy and it *does* deliver!
--
Thanks, Lisa. Preserved lemons are something else, aren’t they?
--
Hi, Ann. A little, as you know, goes a long way. Surely you can spare a tablespoon or so for this. )
--
Lucy – Exactly…exciting and elegant. Wish I had prepared twice the quantity, but that is easy enough to remedy.


Watch the video: Moroccan Chickpea and Lentil Soup Video, Vegetable Recipe, Vegetable Soup, Vegetable (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kendrik

    agree with all of you !!!!!

  2. Dujas

    Great idea, I agree.

  3. Gutaxe

    Your thought is brilliant

  4. Randon

    What is funny question



Write a message