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What to Serve for a Tasty Traditional Passover Feast

What to Serve for a Tasty Traditional Passover Feast


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Celebrate this holiday in style with these fantastic classic Passover recipes

Chicken soup with matzo balls has to feature at every Passover.

Despite Passover being a holiday that has so many restrictions on what you can and can’t eat, it is definitely a holiday that focuses on food. The Passover feast is always a momentous evening where Jewish families come together, retell the story of the Exodus (using the symbolism of the Seder plate and the story told in the Haggadah), and share a fabulous, traditional meal. Make sure your holiday feast stays true to tradition, without being repetitive and lacking in flavor, by following these fantastic recipes.

What to Serve for a Tasty Traditional Passover Feast (Slideshow)

Symbolism and tradition really come together at Passover. The time-honored Passover feast deserves all the attention it demands, and with all the rituals and delicious dishes associated with it, it will always thrill the family and friends seated around the table. Add some exciting flourishes to the dinner staples to give the meal a more modern hint. There’s a fine line between maintaining the symbolic, nostalgic charm of the classic dishes, and spicing up what could otherwise be a repetitive holiday dinner.

Start your meal with a light chicken soup with fluffy matzo balls floating on its surface, and follow the broth with hearty, Mediterranean-inspired Meyer lemon beef brisket. With plenty of kosher-for-Passover sides to brighten up your busy Passover table, everyone will be stuffed full by the end of the meal. Just because wheat products aren’t allowed over Passover doesn’t mean that you have to forgo dessert: Either layer up matzo crackers with melted chocolate, churn a simple, but seriously intense double chocolate sorbet, or serve up a slice of sweet, fruity apple cake. Whichever recipes you choose, make sure you celebrate the holiday in style, with a fabulous traditional feast.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.


A Lighter Passover Feast

The Passover Seder -- or feast -- is one I look forward to all year. During Passover week, most starches are forbidden, including wheat, rice, corn and even high fructose corn syrup. It’s the closest I’ll ever get to a carb-free diet! Of course, not all Passover classics are lighter fare, but here are some traditional favorites I plan to serve.

It's classic to kick off the feast with a piece of cold gefilte fish (ground fish) served with a tablespoon of spicy horseradish (the purple one made with beets).

Next up, brisket is the centerpiece for the main course. When you're making it, be sure to use Passover-friendly cooking oils (canola oil isn't) and make sure to use kosher-for-Passover condiments. Brisket goes well with cucumber salad, a favorite from my childhood that's made with kosher vinegar.

And don’t forget dessert! Macaroons and chocolate-covered matzo are popular Passover sweets, but a simple fruit salad is a lighter option. You might even try a sweetened fruit compote. Mix together dried apricots, pears and prunes smother them in a little sugar, cinnamon and clove — what a perfect way to end your evening.



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