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A Tupac-Inspired Pop-Up Restaurant is Coming to New York City

A Tupac-Inspired Pop-Up Restaurant is Coming to New York City



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The pop-up coincides with Shakur’s induction into the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame, at which a tribute will be led by Snoop Dogg

Sweet Chick is owned and backed by John Seymour and rapper Nas.

This weekend, New Yorkers will get a chance to dine as legendary rapper Tupac Shakur once would — the Powamekka Café is taking over Sweet Chick in the Lower East Side. The restaurant concept was crafted by the estate of Tupac Shakur based on three pages of the rapper's notes written before his untimely death in 1996.

“Tupac’s creative vision was limitless. He was constantly working on ideas and plans that reached far beyond music and film,” Tom Whalley, trustee of Shakur’s estate, said in a press release. “One of the things he was extremely passionate about was opening a restaurant; he even sketched out plans and a concept for a menu. We are proud to bring Tupac's Powamekka Café to life."

Diners can expect a menu full of “the finest in down-home Southern,” including meatloaf, gumbo, and “his cousin Jamala’s fried chicken wings,” according to the café’s page on Reserve. The café will also honor the late rapper with memorabilia such as childhood pictures, poetry, and music from his favorite artists.

The pop-up will run from April 7 through April 9 at 178 Ludlow Street. Reservations can be made online.


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In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


Share All sharing options for: Building a Restaurant Where People Want to Eat — and Work

In 2019, Ed Szymanski and Patricia Howard were sitting on a bench in New York City’s West Village neighborhood when they shook hands and agreed to open Dame, a British fish and chips restaurant. The project would be a culmination of their many years in the restaurant industry — including Howard at Red Gate Bakery, Szymanski at Cherry Point, and both at the Beatrice Inn, where they met.

But on top of being a celebration of the duo’s careers, Dame is a restaurant driven by community. It began in February 2020 as a pop-up, pivoted this past winter to a grocery store that still sells sought-after fish and chips twice a week, and will open this June as an English seafood restaurant in a brick-and-mortar space next door. But Dame truly embraced its business model last summer and fall when it hosted a weekly pop-up series in which friends took over the restaurant space, with proceeds benefiting various charities. Howard, 29, and Szymanski, 27, see their restaurant as not solely theirs but one they can share with chef friends, former dishwashers, and current staffers who want to try out their own restaurant concepts or simply cook for a crowd for just one day.


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