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Georgian Stuffed Mushrooms with Sulguni Cheese

Georgian Stuffed Mushrooms with Sulguni Cheese



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Ingredients

  • 10 Large Button Mushrooms (about 1 lb)
  • 2 Tablespoons Butter
  • 5 Ounces Sulguni (or Provolone) Cheese
  • Salt and Pepper to Taste
  • Fresh Cilantro or Parsley (as a garnish- optional)

Directions

1. Wash and dry the mushrooms.

2. Remove the stems and place in a shallow baking dish.

3. Season lightly with salt and pepper

4. Add about 1/2 teaspoon of butter to each mushroom cap.

5. Grate the cheese and distribute evenly inside each cap.

6. Place in a preheated 400 degree oven for 20 - 30 minutes until the cheese begins to brown.

7. Garnish (if desired) and serve immediately.

Nutritional Facts

Servings5

Calories Per Serving160

Folate equivalent (total)18µg5%

Riboflavin (B2)0.4mg26.3%


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Georgian Food: 10 Dishes from a Country that Knows How to Feast

Nestled in the Caucasus, at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, neighbouring Russia, Turkey, Armenia and Azerbaijan, lies Georgia, the small country with a big appetite.

By geographical and political design, the country has absorbed neighbouring culinary influences over the centuries, yet it's identity remains intact. By nature, Georgian food is fresh, honest, robust, vegetable-driven and true to its roots.

Walnuts are the cornerstone of the Georgian kitchen, while freshly baked bread, fresh fruit and vegetables and cheeses are never far away. Chilli and spices add warmth and depth to meat dishes while coriander and parsley add interest to salads. And if you like it hot there's always the spicy sauce, Adjika, originating in Abkhazia and made from red peppers, garlic, and herbs.

But most importantly, Georgian food is for sharing. In a country where a guest is considered as a gift, it's no surprise that Georgian food is a generous reflection of the hospitality of the people. Nowhere is this felt more than at the Supra, a traditional Georgian feast, where a generous serving of Georgian conviviality comes topped up with copious amounts of free-flowing local wine.

If you're ever lucky enough to be invited to a Georgian supra, or seated in a Georgian restaurant, below is a snapshot of some of the Georgian food that will feature. And if you're chosen to be 'tamada' or the toastmaster for the occasion be sure to have sufficiently profound words up your sleeve to entertain your newly made friends.


Watch the video: Stuffed mushrooms with cheese and zaatar (August 2022).